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  • Vertical-centering and overflow Excel-style in CSS?

    - by Eric Grange
    Is there a way to perform a vertical centering of a variable-sized multi-line content within a fixed-size div, with hidden overflow? The aim would be to reproduce what you can see in Excel cells: when the content fits the container, it should be vertically centered, when it is larger, the parts that overflow should be hidden (and the content still vertically aligned), like in an Excel cell whose neighbours aren't empty. I know how to vertically center using CSS, I know how to hide overflow when the content isn't vertically centered, but I've no idea how to do both at the same time... Is Javascript the only answer? The trick is that CSS positioning approaches don't work with variable-sized content (my content is dynamic text), and when you use display:table-cell, it effectively disables CSS overflow control (and the container grows to accomodate the content).

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  • Is this possible? Overflow-y:visible with overflow-x:scroll/auto

    - by Kostrzak
    We have a problem in our team which we cannot solve :/ We made our own Grid control. When you click on the icon next to column name, the pop-up div (call it divFilter) appears and you can set filtering there. There can be dynamically generated div for each column so we can have f.e 5 divFilters in 5 different places. It works, but the only problem is that when there is for example 1-2 records on the Grid, the pop-up div will be displayed under horizontal scroll of div. We've tried with z-index but it looks like that won't work. We can set overflow:visible but we also need that horizontal scroll(our grids have up to 50 columns). We thought that we can solve it buy setting overflow-y visible and overflow-x:scroll but according to our tests and that page: http://www.brunildo.org/test/Overflowxy2.html it isn't possible(for IE7,IE8). I've also found this similar question CSS overflow-y:visible, overflow-x:scroll ,but our pop-up div must be position:absolute, because we need to position them under columns. Any ideas or workaround to it? Is it even possible to set it only with CSS without using Javascript(for dynamically changing gridview hight etc.). Thanks!!

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  • Getting to grips with the stack in nasm

    - by MarkPearl
    Today I spent a good part of my day getting to grips with the stack and nasm. After looking at my notes on nasm I think this is one area for the course I am doing they could focus more on… So here are some snippets I have put together that have helped me understand a little bit about the stack… Simplest example of the stack You will probably see examples like the following in circulation… these demonstrate the simplest use of the stack… org 0x100 bits 16 jmp main main: push 42h push 43h push 44h mov ah,2h ;set to display characters pop dx    ;get the first value int 21h   ;and display it pop dx    ;get 2nd value int 21h   ;and display it pop dx    ;get 3rd value int 21h   ;and display it int 20h The output from above code would be… DCB Decoupling code using “call” and “ret” This is great, but it oversimplifies what I want to use the stack for… I do not know if this goes against the grain of assembly programmers or not, but I want to write loosely coupled assembly code – and I want to use the stack as a mechanism for passing values into my decoupled code. In nasm we have the call and return instructions, which provides a mechanism for decoupling code, for example the following could be done… org 0x100 bits 16 jmp main ;---------------------------------------- displayChar: mov ah,2h mov dx,41h int 21h ret ;---------------------------------------- main: call displayChar int 20h   This would output the following to the console A So, it would seem that call and ret allow us to jump to segments of our code and then return back to the calling position – a form of segmenting the code into what we would called in higher order languages “functions” or “methods”. The only issue is, in higher order languages there is a way to pass parameters into the functions and return results. Because of the primitive nature of the call and ret instructions, this does not seem to be obvious. We could of course use the registers to pass values into the subroutine and set values coming out, but the problem with this is we… Have a limited number of registers Are threading our code with tight coupling (it would be hard to migrate methods outside of their intended use in a particular program to another one) With that in mind, I turn to the stack to provide a loosely coupled way of calling subroutines… First attempt with the Stack Initially I thought this would be simple… we could use code that looks as follows to achieve what I want… org 0x100 bits 16 jmp main ;---------------------------------------- displayChar: mov ah,2h pop dx int 21h ret ;---------------------------------------- main: push 41h call displayChar int 20h   However running this application does not give the desired result, I want an ‘A’ to be returned, and I am getting something totally different (you will to). Reading up on the call and ret instructions a discovery is made… they are pushing and popping things onto and off the stack as well… When the call instruction is executed, the current value of IP (the address of the instruction to follow) is pushed onto the stack, when ret is called, the last value on the stack is popped off into the IP register. In effect what the above code is doing is as follows with the stack… push 41h push current value of ip pop current value of ip to dx pop 41h to ip This is not what I want, I need to access the 41h that I pushed onto the stack, but the call value (which is necessary) is putting something in my way. So, what to do? Remember we have other registers we can use as well as a thing called indirect addressing… So, after some reading around, I came up with the following approach using indirect addressing… org 0x100 bits 16 jmp main ;---------------------------------------- displayChar: mov bp,sp mov ah,2h mov dx,[bp+2] int 21h ret ;---------------------------------------- main: push 41h call displayChar int 20h In essence, what I have done here is used a trick with the stack pointer… it goes as follows… Push 41 onto the stack Make the call to the function, which will push the IP register onto the stack and then jump to the displayChar label Move the value in the stack point to the bp register (sp currently points at IP register) Move the at the location of bp minus 2 bytes to dx (this is now the value 41h) display it, execute the ret instruction, which pops the ip value off the stack and goes back to the calling point This approach is still very raw, some further reading around shows that I should be pushing the value of bp onto the stack before replacing it with sp, but it is the starting thread to getting loosely coupled subroutines. Let’s see if you get what the following output would be? org 0x100 bits 16 jmp main ;---------------------------------------- displayChar: mov bp,sp mov ah,2h mov dx,[bp+4] int 21h mov dx,[bp+2] int 21h ret ;---------------------------------------- main: push 41h push 42h call displayChar int 20h The output is… AB Where to from here? If by any luck some assembly programmer comes along and see this code and notices that I have made some fundamental flaw in my logic… I would like to know, so please leave a comment… appreciate any feedback!

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  • Stack vs queue -based programming language efficiency [closed]

    - by Core Xii
    Suppose there are two programming languages; one where the only form of storage is one (preferred) or two (may be required for Turing-completeness) stacks, and another where the only form of storage is a single queue, with appropriate instructions in each to manipulate their respective storage to achieve Turing-completeness. Which one can more efficiently encode complex algorithms? Such that most given algorithms take less code to implement, less time to compute and less memory to do so. Also, how do they compare to a language with a traditional array (or unbounded tape, if you will) as storage?

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  • Stack overflow in xp cmd console

    - by Dave
    I am using an older program whose source code I cannot see. I am using the cmd.exe console in windows xp. The program ran with no problems on an xp machine last year, while a stack overflow code 2000 error was observed on a different xp machine (easy fix - use the machine that works). I tried running the program on the previously working machine lately, and now am getting the same error. No changes to the os were made and I did not change the service pack version. Any ideas on how to get around this stack overflow error so I can use the program? Dosbox will at least open the program, however it does not run to completion. Thanks!

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  • error of integer overflow

    - by user308565
    This the part of my OpenGL code, I am getting an error for : struct Ball { float x; float y; float rot; float dir; bool rmv; Ball* next; }; Ball* curBall; void addBall() { if (balls==NULL) { balls=new Ball; balls->next=NULL; curBall=balls; } else { curBall->next=new Ball; curBall=curBall->next; curBall->next=NULL; } curBall->x=((float)rand()/(float)(RAND_MAX+1))*(ww-1) +1; curBall->y=((float)rand()/(float)(RAND_MAX+1))*(wh-1) +1; curBall->dir=((float)rand()/(float)(RAND_MAX+1))*(2*PI-1) +1; curBall->rot=((float)rand()/(float)(RAND_MAX+1))*(359) +1; curBall->rmv=false; } error : In function ‘void addBall()’: file.cpp:120: warning: integer overflow in expression file.cpp:121: warning: integer overflow in expression file.cpp:122: warning: integer overflow in expression file.cpp:123: warning: integer overflow in expression

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  • NPTL Default Stack Size Problem

    - by eyazici
    Hello, I am developing a multithread modular application using C programming language and NPTL 2.6. For each plugin, a POSIX thread is created. The problem is each thread has its own stack area, since default stack size depends on user's choice, this may results in huge memory consumption in some cases. To prevent unnecessary memory usage I used something similar to this to change stack size before creating each thread: pthread_attr_t attr; pthread_attr_init (&attr); pthread_attr_getstacksize(&attr, &st1); if(pthread_attr_setstacksize (&attr, MODULE_THREAD_SIZE) != 0) perror("Stack ERR"); pthread_attr_getstacksize(&attr, &st2); printf("OLD:%d, NEW:%d - MIN: %d\n", st1, st2, PTHREAD_STACK_MIN); pthread_attr_setdetachstate(&attr, PTHREAD_CREATE_DETACHED); /* "this" is static data structure that stores plugin related data */ pthread_create(&this->runner, &attr, (void *)(void *)this->run, NULL); EDIT I: pthread_create() section added. This did not work work as I expected, the stack size reported by pthread_attr_getstacksize() is changed but total memory usage of the application (from ps/top/pmap output) did not changed: OLD:10485760, NEW:65536 - MIN: 16384 When I use ulimit -s MY_STACK_SIZE_LIMIT before starting application I achieve the expected result. My questions are: 1-) Is there any portable(between UNIX variants) way to change (default)thread stack size after starting application(before creating thread of course)? 2-) Is it possible to use same stack area for every thread? 3-) Is it possible completely disable stack for threads without much pain?

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  • Search in Stack

    - by WPS
    Hi, I've a Java Stack created and some custom objects added to it. These objects contains unique id as one of their field. I need to get the index of that object in stack based on the unique name. Please find the example. class TestVO{ private String name; private String uniqueId; //getters and setters } public class TestStack{ public static void main(String args[]){ TestVO vo1=new TestVO(); TestVO vo2=new TestVO(); TestVO vo3=new TestVO(); vo1.setName("Test Name 1") vo1.setId("123") vo2.setName("Test name 2"); vo2.setId("234"); Stack<TestVO> stack=new Stack<TestVO>(); stack.add(vo1); stack.add(vo2); //I need to get the index of a VO from stack using it's unique ID } } Can someone please help me to implement this?

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  • Implementing arrays using a stack

    - by Zack
    My programming language has no arrays, no lists, no pointers, no eval and no variable variables. All it has: Ordinary variables like you know them from most programming languages: They all have an exact name and a value. One stack. Functions provided are: push (add element to top), pop (remove element from top, get value) and empty (check if stack is empty) My language is turing-complete. (Basic arithmetics, conditional jumps, etc implemented) That means, it must be possible to implement some sort of list or array, right? But I have no idea how... What I want to achieve: Create a function which can retrieve and/or change an element x of the stack. I could easily add this function in the implementation of my language, in the interpreter, but I want to do it in my programming language. "Solution" one (Accessing an element x, counting from the stack top) Create a loop. Pop off the element from the stack top x times. The last element popped of is element number x. I end up with a destroyed stack. Solution two: Do the same as above, but store all popped off values in a second stack. Then you could move all elements back after you are done. But you know what? I don't have a second stack!

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  • stack and heap issue for iPhone memory management

    - by Forrest
    From this post I got know that the Objective-C runtime does not allow objects to be instantiated on the stack, but only on the heap; this means that you don’t have “automatic objects”, nor things like auto_ptr objects to help you manage memory; Someone give one example in post Objective C: Memory Allocation on stack vs. heap NSString* str = @"hello"; but this NSString is also not allocated in stack. Feel odd that this str is static. (Who can explain this ? ) Question here is that why there is no heap ? even mixing c++ together with Object C ? /////////////////////////////// Clear my question /////////////////////////////// I am confused , so questions are not clear. Let me put in this way. 1) All Object C objects should be alloc in stack ? ( I think yes ) 2)In C++, there are stack for memory, so for iOS app, also have stack ? ( I think yes ) 3) for iOS app, if only use Object C, so what is the usage of stack ? what kind of objects should use stack then ?

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  • Write magic bytes to the stack to monitor its usage

    - by tkarls
    I have a problem on an embedded device that I think might be related to a stack overflow. In order to test this I was planning to fill the stack with magic bytes and then periodically check if the stack has overflowed by examining how much of my magic bytes that are left intact. But I can't get the routine for marking the stack to work. The application keeps crashing instantly. This is what I have done just at the entry point of the program. //fill most of stack with magic bytes int stackvar = 0; int stackAddr = int(&stackvar); int stackAddrEnd = stackAddr - 25000; BYTE* stackEnd = (BYTE*) stackAddrEnd; for(int i = 0; i < 25000; ++i) { *(stackEnd + i) = 0xFA; } Please note that the allocated stack is larger than 25k. So I'm counting on some stack space to already be used at this point. Also note that the stack grows from higher to lower addresses that's why I'm trying to fill from the bottom and up. But as I said, this will crash. I must be missing something here.

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  • Overflow issue in IE 7

    - by Spencer Carnage
    I need some help with CSS overflow in IE, namely IE 7. I want the nested div content to be hidden. <div style="width:100px; height:100px; overflow:hidden; border:1px dashed red;"> <div style="width:60px; left:80px; position:relative;">hidden stuff goes here</div> </div> It works fine in FF but in IE 7, the overflow content is not hidden.

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  • set overflow hidden in some cases

    - by Richard
    Hello, my question is How can I set overflow hidden in cases where the html go's outside the screen Right now I have set html {overflow: hidden;} in the head tag off the page. So, it's hidden all the time In my particular case the errors that I show in the registration process cannot be seen on my 13inch laptop, but I don't want to show the scrollbars all the time. That's why I want it to set(or unset) based on the fact if there is overflow or not. What would be the best way? thanks, Richard

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  • Make overflow hidden when shrinking div

    - by johnnietheblack
    I have a div with an image in it, and the image is too large for the div. I have solved the overflow problem with the obvious CSS overflow:hidden trick. But, the problem is that when the div's parent resizes (shrinks), the div holding the image won't shrink because of the image in it. Is there a way to have a resizable div with an image in it (almost like a background image) that overflows? MY DIV STRUCTURE: <div id="parent"> <div id="image_holder"> <!-- this image will inevitably be larger than its parent div --> <img src="too_big_for_div.jpg" /> </div> </div> MY CSS: #parent { width:100%;} #image_holder { width:100%; overflow:hidden;} The #image_holder div will not resize to a smaller dimension now. Any ideas?

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  • overflow hidden not working on touch device

    - by Jesper Ong
    I have a problem with overflow:hidden on a touch device. Basically I have my html and body on overflow:hidden. With a contact form outside(bottom) of the window. On clicking a button this form will animate in. This is so far working great on desktop browsers. But on touch devices, I seem to be able to scroll down and view the form. I can't seem to find solutions after much googling. Is there anyway to force overflow:hidden on touch devices? Any help much appreciated!

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  • How to write a buffer-overflow exploit in windows XP,x86?

    - by Mask
    void function(int a, int b, int c) { char buffer1[5]; char buffer2[10]; int *ret; ret = buffer1 + 12; (*ret) += 8;//why is it 8?? } void main() { int x; x = 0; function(1,2,3); x = 1; printf("%d\n",x); } The above demo is from here: http://insecure.org/stf/smashstack.html But it's not working here: D:\test>gcc -Wall -Wextra hw.cpp && a.exe hw.cpp: In function `void function(int, int, int)': hw.cpp:6: warning: unused variable 'buffer2' hw.cpp: At global scope: hw.cpp:4: warning: unused parameter 'a' hw.cpp:4: warning: unused parameter 'b' hw.cpp:4: warning: unused parameter 'c' 1 And I don't understand why it's 8 though the author thinks: A little math tells us the distance is 8 bytes. My gdb dump as called: Dump of assembler code for function main: 0x004012ee <main+0>: push %ebp 0x004012ef <main+1>: mov %esp,%ebp 0x004012f1 <main+3>: sub $0x18,%esp 0x004012f4 <main+6>: and $0xfffffff0,%esp 0x004012f7 <main+9>: mov $0x0,%eax 0x004012fc <main+14>: add $0xf,%eax 0x004012ff <main+17>: add $0xf,%eax 0x00401302 <main+20>: shr $0x4,%eax 0x00401305 <main+23>: shl $0x4,%eax 0x00401308 <main+26>: mov %eax,0xfffffff8(%ebp) 0x0040130b <main+29>: mov 0xfffffff8(%ebp),%eax 0x0040130e <main+32>: call 0x401b00 <_alloca> 0x00401313 <main+37>: call 0x4017b0 <__main> 0x00401318 <main+42>: movl $0x0,0xfffffffc(%ebp) 0x0040131f <main+49>: movl $0x3,0x8(%esp) 0x00401327 <main+57>: movl $0x2,0x4(%esp) 0x0040132f <main+65>: movl $0x1,(%esp) 0x00401336 <main+72>: call 0x4012d0 <function> 0x0040133b <main+77>: movl $0x1,0xfffffffc(%ebp) 0x00401342 <main+84>: mov 0xfffffffc(%ebp),%eax 0x00401345 <main+87>: mov %eax,0x4(%esp) 0x00401349 <main+91>: movl $0x403000,(%esp) 0x00401350 <main+98>: call 0x401b60 <printf> 0x00401355 <main+103>: leave 0x00401356 <main+104>: ret 0x00401357 <main+105>: nop 0x00401358 <main+106>: add %al,(%eax) 0x0040135a <main+108>: add %al,(%eax) 0x0040135c <main+110>: add %al,(%eax) 0x0040135e <main+112>: add %al,(%eax) End of assembler dump. Dump of assembler code for function function: 0x004012d0 <function+0>: push %ebp 0x004012d1 <function+1>: mov %esp,%ebp 0x004012d3 <function+3>: sub $0x38,%esp 0x004012d6 <function+6>: lea 0xffffffe8(%ebp),%eax 0x004012d9 <function+9>: add $0xc,%eax 0x004012dc <function+12>: mov %eax,0xffffffd4(%ebp) 0x004012df <function+15>: mov 0xffffffd4(%ebp),%edx 0x004012e2 <function+18>: mov 0xffffffd4(%ebp),%eax 0x004012e5 <function+21>: movzbl (%eax),%eax 0x004012e8 <function+24>: add $0x5,%al 0x004012ea <function+26>: mov %al,(%edx) 0x004012ec <function+28>: leave 0x004012ed <function+29>: ret In my case the distance should be - = 5,right?But it seems not working..

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  • How to write a buffer-overflow exploit in GCC,windows XP,x86?

    - by Mask
    void function(int a, int b, int c) { char buffer1[5]; char buffer2[10]; int *ret; ret = buffer1 + 12; (*ret) += 8;//why is it 8?? } void main() { int x; x = 0; function(1,2,3); x = 1; printf("%d\n",x); } The above demo is from here: http://insecure.org/stf/smashstack.html But it's not working here: D:\test>gcc -Wall -Wextra hw.cpp && a.exe hw.cpp: In function `void function(int, int, int)': hw.cpp:6: warning: unused variable 'buffer2' hw.cpp: At global scope: hw.cpp:4: warning: unused parameter 'a' hw.cpp:4: warning: unused parameter 'b' hw.cpp:4: warning: unused parameter 'c' 1 And I don't understand why it's 8 though the author thinks: A little math tells us the distance is 8 bytes. My gdb dump as called: Dump of assembler code for function main: 0x004012ee <main+0>: push %ebp 0x004012ef <main+1>: mov %esp,%ebp 0x004012f1 <main+3>: sub $0x18,%esp 0x004012f4 <main+6>: and $0xfffffff0,%esp 0x004012f7 <main+9>: mov $0x0,%eax 0x004012fc <main+14>: add $0xf,%eax 0x004012ff <main+17>: add $0xf,%eax 0x00401302 <main+20>: shr $0x4,%eax 0x00401305 <main+23>: shl $0x4,%eax 0x00401308 <main+26>: mov %eax,0xfffffff8(%ebp) 0x0040130b <main+29>: mov 0xfffffff8(%ebp),%eax 0x0040130e <main+32>: call 0x401b00 <_alloca> 0x00401313 <main+37>: call 0x4017b0 <__main> 0x00401318 <main+42>: movl $0x0,0xfffffffc(%ebp) 0x0040131f <main+49>: movl $0x3,0x8(%esp) 0x00401327 <main+57>: movl $0x2,0x4(%esp) 0x0040132f <main+65>: movl $0x1,(%esp) 0x00401336 <main+72>: call 0x4012d0 <function> 0x0040133b <main+77>: movl $0x1,0xfffffffc(%ebp) 0x00401342 <main+84>: mov 0xfffffffc(%ebp),%eax 0x00401345 <main+87>: mov %eax,0x4(%esp) 0x00401349 <main+91>: movl $0x403000,(%esp) 0x00401350 <main+98>: call 0x401b60 <printf> 0x00401355 <main+103>: leave 0x00401356 <main+104>: ret 0x00401357 <main+105>: nop 0x00401358 <main+106>: add %al,(%eax) 0x0040135a <main+108>: add %al,(%eax) 0x0040135c <main+110>: add %al,(%eax) 0x0040135e <main+112>: add %al,(%eax) End of assembler dump. Dump of assembler code for function function: 0x004012d0 <function+0>: push %ebp 0x004012d1 <function+1>: mov %esp,%ebp 0x004012d3 <function+3>: sub $0x38,%esp 0x004012d6 <function+6>: lea 0xffffffe8(%ebp),%eax 0x004012d9 <function+9>: add $0xc,%eax 0x004012dc <function+12>: mov %eax,0xffffffd4(%ebp) 0x004012df <function+15>: mov 0xffffffd4(%ebp),%edx 0x004012e2 <function+18>: mov 0xffffffd4(%ebp),%eax 0x004012e5 <function+21>: movzbl (%eax),%eax 0x004012e8 <function+24>: add $0x5,%al 0x004012ea <function+26>: mov %al,(%edx) 0x004012ec <function+28>: leave 0x004012ed <function+29>: ret In my case the distance should be - = 5,right?But it seems not working.. Why function needs 56 bytes for local variables?( sub $0x38,%esp )

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  • Stack & heap understanding question

    - by Petr
    Hi, I would really appreciate if someone could tell me whether I understand it well: class X { A a1=new A() //reference on the stack, object value on the heap a1.VarA=5; //on the stack - value type A a2=new A() //reference on the stack, object value on the heap a2.VarA=10; //on the stack - value type a1=a2; //on the stack, the target of a1 reference is updated to a2 value on the heap //also both a1 and a2 references are on the stack, while their "object" values on the heap. But what about VarA variable, its still pure value type? } class A { int VarA; }

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  • Stack / base pointers in assembly

    - by flyingcrab
    I know this topic has been covered ad-naseum here, and other places on the internet - but hopefully the question is a simple one as I try to get my head around assembly... So if i understand correctly the ebp (base pointer) will point to the top of the stack, and the esp (stack pointer) will point to the bottom -- since the stack grows downward. esp therefore points to the 'current location'. So on a function call, once you've saved the ebp on the stack you insert a new stack frame - for the function. So in the case of the image below, if you started from N-3 you would go to N-2 with a function call. But when you are at N-2 - is your ebp == 25 and the esp == 24 (at least initially, before any data is placed on the stack)? Is this correct or am I of on a tangent here? Thanks!

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  • Web service creates stack overflow

    - by mouthpiec
    I have an application that when executed as a windows application works fine, but when converted to a web service, in some instances (which were tested successfully) by the windows app) creates a stack overflow. Do you have an idea of what can cause this? (Note that it works fine when the web service is placed on the localhost). Could it be that the stack size of a Web Service is smaller than that of a Window Application? UPDATE The below is the code in which I am getting a stack overflow error private bool CheckifPixelsNeighbour(Pixel c1, Pixel c2, int DistanceAllowed) { bool Neighbour = false; if ((Math.Abs(c1.X - c2.X) <= DistanceAllowed) && Math.Abs(c1.Y - c2.Y) <= DistanceAllowed) { Neighbour = true; } return Neighbour; }

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  • Catching an exception class within a template

    - by Todd Bauer
    I'm having a problem using the exception class Overflow() for a Stack template I'm creating. If I define the class regularly there is no problem. If I define the class as a template, I cannot make my call to catch() work properly. I have a feeling it's simply syntax, but I can't figure it out for the life of me. #include<iostream> #include<exception> using namespace std; template <class T> class Stack { private: T *stackArray; int size; int top; public: Stack(int size) { this->size = size; stackArray = new T[size]; top = 0; } ~Stack() { delete[] stackArray; } void push(T value) { if (isFull()) throw Overflow(); stackArray[top] = value; top++; } bool isFull() { if (top == size) return true; else return false; } class Overflow {}; }; int main() { try { Stack<double> Stack(5); Stack.push( 5.0); Stack.push(10.1); Stack.push(15.2); Stack.push(20.3); Stack.push(25.4); Stack.push(30.5); } catch (Stack::Overflow) { cout << "ERROR! The stack is full.\n"; } return 0; } The problem is in the catch (Stack::Overflow) statement. As I said, if the class is not a template, this works just fine. However, once I define it as a template, this ceases to work. I've tried all sorts of syntaxes, but I always get one of two sets of error messages from the compiler. If I use catch(Stack::Overflow): ch18pr01.cpp(89) : error C2955: 'Stack' : use of class template requires template argument list ch18pr01.cpp(13) : see declaration of 'Stack' ch18pr01.cpp(89) : error C2955: 'Stack' : use of class template requires template argument list ch18pr01.cpp(13) : see declaration of 'Stack' ch18pr01.cpp(89) : error C2316: 'Stack::Overflow' : cannot be caught as the destructor and/or copy constructor are inaccessible EDIT: I meant If I use catch(Stack<double>::Overflow) or any variety thereof: ch18pr01.cpp(89) : error C2061: syntax error : identifier 'Stack' ch18pr01.cpp(89) : error C2310: catch handlers must specify one type ch18pr01.cpp(95) : error C2317: 'try' block starting on line '75' has no catch handlers I simply can not figure this out. Does anyone have any idea?

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  • Determining the maximum stack depth

    - by Joa Ebert
    Imagine I have a stack-based toy language that comes with the operations Push, Pop, Jump and If. I have a program and its input is the toy language. For instance I get the sequence Push 1 Push 1 Pop Pop In that case the maximum stack would be 2. A more complicated example would use branches. Push 1 Push true If .success Pop Jump .continue .success: Push 1 Push 1 Pop Pop Pop .continue: In this case the maximum stack would be 3. However it is not possible to get the maximum stack by walking top to bottom as shown in this case since it would result in a stack-underflow error actually. CFGs to the rescue you can build a graph and walk every possible path of the basic blocks you have. However since the number of paths can grow quickly for n vertices you get (n-1)! possible paths. My current approach is to simplify the graph as much as possible and to have less possible paths. This works but I would consider it ugly. Is there a better (read: faster) way to attack this problem? I am fine if the algorithm produces a stack depth that is not optimal. If the correct stack size is m then my only constraint is that the result n is n = m. Is there maybe a greedy algorithm available that would produce a good result here?

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  • CSS overflow and word-wrap behaviour not helping me at all

    - by henriquev
    You can see how the filename field should look at http://www.plifk.com/henvic/114 and how it breaks the layout at http://www.plifk.com/henvic/159 If I used 108574main-neutron-star-and-a-very-bad-overfow-will-happen-here-so-sad.mpg I would not get an overflow, but in the first line "108574main-neutron-star-and-a-very-" and in the second line a "bad-overfow-happens.mpg". What can I do to avoid getting an overflow? Please know that I don't want to use quirks (like PHP's wordwrap, neither JavaScript if possible) and I've tried some ways in CSS with word-wrap, etc, but nothing worked out. I've also tried word-break: break-all (tested on Firefox only) but it didn't work also. Even the overflow: hidden; is not working... I'm not very familiar with web designing (indeed I try to do everything by the standards, etc) and I'm completely lost right now. The uncompressed CSS file can be seen at http://pastebin.ca/1802451 Now... I really understand that this is expected once the word-wrap is supposed for text, not characters. But hey, even with break-all it doesn't do anything. How can? Thank you very much in advance.

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  • How to write Haskell function to verify parentheses matching?

    - by Rizo
    I need to write a function par :: String -> Bool to verify if a given string with parentheses is matching using stack module. Ex: par "(((()[()])))" = True par "((]())" = False Here's my stack module implementation: module Stack (Stack, push, pop, top, empty, isEmpty) where data Stack a = Stk [a] deriving (Show) push :: a -> Stack a -> Stack a push x (Stk xs) = Stk (x:xs) pop :: Stack a -> Stack a pop (Stk (_:xs)) = Stk xs pop _ = error "Stack.pop: empty stack" top :: Stack a -> a top (Stk (x:_)) = x top _ = error "Stack.top: empty stack" empty :: Stack a empty = Stk [] isEmpty :: Stack a -> Bool isEmpty (Stk [])= True isEmpty (Stk _) = False So I need to implement a 'par' function that would test a string of parentheses and say if parentheses in it matches or not. How can I do that using a stack?

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