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  • Entity type for freelance programmer

    - by Icode4food
    I am a freelance programmer just getting started. I have been running the last 6 months just as a sole prop. I am beginning to wonder if this is wise or if I had maybe better consider LLC or something. I am working alone and generally have a good relationship with my clients. I'm not asking for legal advice, I have a basic understanding of the advantages of the different setups, but rather for some experienced suggestions. Is an LLC worth the effort for just guy working by himself? What "on the ground" (not tax) advantages would I have as an LLC? Am I wide open to be sued as a sole prop?

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  • What undergraduate course to choose for a mature programmer returning to study

    - by Dve
    I have been developing applications (mostly web-based) for almost 10 years now and have learnt pretty much everything I know through experience (and the internet!). I wouldn't call myself an advanced programmer, but I am quite proficient in several languages (C#, Javascript, Ruby, HTML/CSS etc) and spend a quite a bit of time working on personal projects and reading countless books & articles. I am looking to emigrate to Canada, hopefully Vancouver (im from the UK) and one way would be on a student visa, if I was going to be studying for a minimum of 2 years. Having never been to university or achieved anything higher than A-Levels I am quite tempted by this path. The thought of learning is more exciting to me now than it was 10 years ago! What would be people recommend as a good undergraduate course to take that would complement this career path? Would Math be beneficial, if so which area of Math? TL;DR What undergraduate course/area of study would complement 10 years of (mostly web-based) programming experience?

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  • big lie about programmer [closed]

    - by gcc
    About computer engineering/ computer science, Can you give me big lie ? ex : - There is no need to attend school ( study computer engineering ). Because every one can code ( write program ) - Programmer cannot do web design , they can only write code - there are no difference between software engineer and coder EDIT: A lie is a type of deception in the form of an untruthful statement, especially with the intention to deceive others. Why someone try to deceive other people especially customer ? I think they try to prove they are real computer engineer without having diploma in computer science. If you look in that manner to my answer you can easily understand what I want

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  • Which language to learn C# or Salesforce.com/apex for C++ programmer [closed]

    - by polapts
    Being a C++ programmer with 7-8 years of experience, I wanted to know the market trends. When I searched a little bit I found more jobs with keyword C# than C++ or Java. I am just wondering if it is a good idea to learn C# or Java from a career perspective. Also, I read somewhere about Salesforce/apex. It was mentioned that this is something in vogue. So my question is which technology I should go for C#/Java/Salesforce(Apex) from career perspective? Thanks

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  • Linux Programmer moving to Windows

    - by cytinus
    I am a fairly proficient Linux programmer. I have been coding in Linux for 4 years, for both personal reasons and for profit. During those 4 years I have not even owned a computer running the Windows operating system. I am looking to expand my horizons into Windows programming, but am finding myself overwhelmed with the lack of what I perceive to be standardization. I feel as though different compilers follow different conventions, and all of the worthwhile IDEs cost money. Whats worse is that so many of the Tutorials are just terrible. If anyone else has taken the switch from Linux to Windows programming, what was the most helpful. What are the most straightforward IDEs and tutorials for using the API. I am looking to do mainly C and C++ development, along with some x86. I have found MASM primarily suits my needs for the latter.

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  • How To Start Programming

    - by nayef harb
    I have taken a programming course 2 years ago but I haven't worked in programming since then. I recently found a programmer job, but there is no programming team so for me to gain valuable experience from. I am Programming by myself and making changes on a program already made by my Ex-colleague. I need to know what should I do to be on the right track for becoming a professional programmer without a team to take experience from. What are the good practices to improve and what are the bad ones? I'm using VB.Net, ASP.Net and SQL.

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  • Programmer's career path

    - by kender
    I've been working as a programmer for the last few years - different companies and freelancing, mostly developing internal-business web applications (well, that's the current model of development, it seems). Besides simple coding I was working on specs, designing applications, and all those around-like things. My question is, what's the career path I should be aiming for? Is it like working on code for the rest of my life? :) Or do programmers make a good manager-position people (I know, those require quite different set of skills) and I should try to improve myself to this direction? I know it's very subjective. Thing is, lately I find myself much more into the designing/working on specs part of the development project then the coding itself. How do you see it? Would you like to go from development to management? Would you like to work on a project with a manager that used to be a coder? Would you like to hire one? :)

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  • Is it worth becoming a programmer?

    - by D. Higueras
    Hi everybody. I'm a first year student in CS and I absolutely love programming. Many people have told me it isn't so good once you start working. Some things like bringing your work home(thinking about how to solve problems), working many hours when the timeline reaches an end an so on. I've heard being a system administrator is a lot less stressing job, since you don't have to worry about it at home. So my questions are(for experienced programmers): Is it worth becoming a programmer? Does your job satisfy you enough to overcome these problems? Thanks in advance.

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  • At what point does a good programmer know he is skilled programmer? [closed]

    - by Eritrea
    Possible Duplicate: How Can I Know Whether I Am a Good Programmer? I am just guessing, there is no end to programming, there is always someone who know what you do not know, once you learn it all something evolves out of somewhere, and you have to learn that one. It is a perpetually process eventually. But, at what point can you consider yourself, you are worth much in the programming world? By the amount of your reputation on Stackechange or if you create your own software...? When can you even know?

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  • Programers first day at work [closed]

    - by peraueb8921
    Next week I am getting my first job as a programmer in a well known company. I have worked in other companies before, but mostly in IT department. As you can understand, I am very determined to succeed in there. I have found some related articles in the Web, but I am not even sure they are written from developers. So I am asking you, to tell us about what will you do in another way if you could "reverse" the time, and what can I do to succeed. Of course "work hard" is one of them but what about book/article reading, certifications, good practises to make good impression to my team leader or whatever else you think would help? I know that it maybe fit better at wordplace.stackexchange.com, but this is a programmer oriented post and can only be answered by experienced programmers. Thank you.

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  • I'm a beginner Java programmer but I want to be useful

    - by user105418
    Programming has always interested me, but after learning some of the basics of Java(I'm talking high school level), I don't really know what to do from there. I want to be able to apply what I learned in some way, whether it be a volunteer project or something, but I probably don't know enough programming. Is it possible for a novice Java programmer to be useful in some way whatsoever. I want to do this because I feel like I could learn more about programming by helping people in theirs, but I'm not sure if I'm even able to this though. Does anyone have any suggestions on how I can contribute to other people's project in some way or how to apply it in some way?

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  • Should a Python programmer learn Ruby?

    - by C J
    Hi! I have been a Python programmer for around 1.5 years (one internship + side projects), so I am comfortable with the language. Given that everyone is talking about Ruby these days, and I mean seriously! No one bothers about Python (from what I've seen). See GitHub. All RoR. I apply for a job and they ask me about RoR. I look at the screencasts on peepcode.com and they are in Ruby. gitimmersion.com has all the tutorial in Ruby! I know this is pretty vague, but still... why Ruby! Everyone these days is obssessed with RoR! Why not Python? Anyways, my questions are: Should I learn Ruby? Is learning Ruby when knowing Python be, er, complicated for me? Or is it going to be just like learning any other language? Thanks!

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  • Programmer friendly non-voxel art styles?

    - by Overv
    Like many other programmers I've always wanted to make a game, but simply lack the skills to do any production quality graphics. I am however sure that I want to do the models and textures myself, because I need a lot of different objects and I am sure I wouldn't be able to find good matching models on 3D sites. That means I'll have to pick an art style that is "simple", programmer friendly. An extreme example of this is of course Minecraft, but I don't want to go that basic. I'm absolutely against creating a voxel game. What kind of art styles are out there that are relatively simple, i.e. things made out of basic shapes and textures, but are still good enough to form a believable and detailed world? An example of what I mean is wind waker. The objects are formed of relatively simples shapes, but still provide enough detail to create a nice, living world. The environment my game is set in is a city environment. What I'm really asking for here are good examples of "simple" art styles applied in practice, so I can choose one that fits my skills.

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  • How to explain pointers to a Java/VB programmer

    - by Skeith
    I am writing a game and my friend has offered to help me as it is a RPG and will take a long time to do the "scripting" bit of the game. The problem is IMO he's not that good a programmer :( (add flame war here). He has only programmed in Java and VB and keeps saying really stupid things to me like "Why don't you drag and drop an onClick event" to design my UI when I'm using DirectX. I tried explaining pointers to him but his response was, if it's just a variable that holds a memory address, why don't you just use an int? I create an instance of an attack class and give the creature a pointer to it so if several creatures use the same attack there is only one instance of it. He keeps saying why not put if statements in the creature class for every attack class and set true for the ones that are there. He has programmed mainly in VB and a little in Java just to learn OOP. How can I explain advanced C++ concepts like pointers and memory management to him? He just doesn't understand there are no super functions like form.show in C++.

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  • Looking for suggestions: becoming a hireable, young programmer [closed]

    - by Dan
    I am a 17 year old Java programmer that has filled the last year with learning all of the ins and outs of Java - Using Eclipse, and the help of a friend of the family (a Java programming architect for some company), I have learned everything from serializing objects, basic networking, generics, reflection, multi-threading, code optimization and efficiency & some concurrency safety - built my own proxy class, and nowadays, I answer questions on Project Euler. I am seeking some suggestions though on where I go next, or where I go from here to get a job in programming. I dedicate at least an hour every day to coding, sometimes literally, the entire day, and I really have come to love the process. I just started reading Effective Java (v2), and learning Scala (as I see often, possibly the Java replacement) I will be going to college for Computer Science next year - and taking AP computer science this year (however, I took a practice exam and got an 87, only need a 60to70 to pass, so no need to study for it too much) -- I was wondering if getting the SE 7 OCA and OCP would help me in trying to get a programming job. I looked around and most people have said online that an OCA/OCP are practically useless, but, at my age do they make me any more credible? More or less, what would you recommend to get a job in programming these days - or distinguish yourself from the crowd? I have enough time and dedication to learn another language, or anything really. Thank you very much.

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  • What tools should every programmer know?

    - by acidzombie24
    What are some tools every programmer know about? Some examples i thought were Source control. (No explanation needed) Profiler. Many could go without but its good to know how to use one when the occasion arise What else? I was thinking a bug report software but i havent used one so i wasnt sure. Should programmers know how to use TRAC? I remember in the past a person telling me if i was making a shared library i should know (Some Name) which generates docs from the source (in that case C++). What was that called and what else should i know about? -edit- what about team management software? any software you could not live without in a specific project would be a good mention. I'll also mention i use VMs frequently during the prototype or end phase to see if there are any issues on a clean XP or linux distro and if i forgot anything in my redistribution. I cant imagine the end/release and testing phase of a project without a VM.

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  • Does an inexperienced programmer need an IDE?

    - by Torben Gundtofte-Bruun
    Reading this other question makes me wonder if I (as an absolute beginner PHP programmer) should stick with WAMP and Notepad++ or to switch to some IDE like Eclipse. It's understandable that skilled developers will benefit from a big shiny IDE. But why should an absolute beginner use an IDE? Do the benefits outweigh the extra challenge of learning the IDE on top of learning to develop? Update for clarification: My goal is to get some basic programming experience. By choosing PHP and WAMP (and FogBugz and Kiln) I hope to avoid having to navigate the tricky / messy OS specifics and compiling etc. and just focus on basic functionality like an online user registration form. I've got lots of theoretical understanding from university a decade ago but no practical experience. I want to remedy that with a hobby project that would be similar to a real-world sellable web app. There are so many questions to ask. So many pitfalls I probably have to blunder into. This question is just one piece (my first!) of that puzzle.

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  • Learning OO for a C Programmer

    - by Holysmoke
    I've been programming professionally in C, and only C, for around 10 years in a variety of roles. As would be normal to expect, I understand the idioms of the language fairly well and beyond that also some of the design nuances - which APIs to make public, who calls what, who does what, what is supposed to reentrant and so on. I grew up reading 'Writing Solid Code', it's early C edition, not the one based on C++. However, I've never ever programmed in an OO language. Now, I want to migrate to writing applications for iPhone (maybe android), so want to learn to use Objective-C and use it with a degree of competence fitting a professional programmer. How do I wrap my head around the OO stuff? What would be your smallest reading list suggestion to me. Is there a book that carries some sort of relatively real world example OO design Objective-C? Besides, the reading what source code would you recommend me to go through. How to learn OO paradigm using Objective-C?

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  • How to tackle an experienced C# Programmer?

    - by nandu.com
    I am a noob in c# and asp.net developing. I have spent 6 months in design and another 6 in sql and asp.net programming. I just know the basics of asp.net and C#. I was programming as per the instruction of my tech leads and all good things changed in a day. :( All my tech leads (2+ experienced) left the company complaining about salary. And instead of those, company has recruited a 5+ experienced programmer cum tech lead (who is very strict), he is expecting me to code anything he says. Previous seniors of me, would say 'use ajax for this, use query for this instead of coding' and so on. I will do it exactly. I am not experienced enough to perform it myself. Now I am in a dilemma. I want to stay in the company and learn some more, but this new tech lead is expecting me to learn everything myself (he is telling me to learn jquery, javascript menus, session and chart in .Net, and so on and do things myself without asking him anything...I mean anything) :(((( PLease suggest to me some good tips to handle him. I think all programmers world wide would have faced a similar problem atleast once in the big programming life. So please..help .. 911

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  • How does a single programmer make a game?

    - by Mike
    I have always been a software developer, but lately I've been wanting to get into games. The only thing stopping me is the fact that I'm a programmer, not an artist. I've made some simple stuff, Tetris, 2D chess things like that but I can't do much art and that's really what holds me back. Now the problem is, I've yet to go to college so most commercial projects wouldn't accept me even to work for free and learn a bit especially with my lack of experience in games and any indie projects I've looked into really have an issue with responding to people interested, or actually completing (or starting really, most don't get past the ideas on paper) the project they want to do. I've looked around locally for artists, anyone who can do modeling, textures or animating or even anyone with some ability to make some more advanced 2D assets to get something like a side-scrolling RPG or something but haven't been able to find anyone. So how do you guys do it? Do I really just have to wait until I can go to college to see if I like working with games or is there some way I can get art (for free, anything I do is just going to be for fun so I don't want to have to sink money into it) and just start messing around on my own? Or am I just having bad luck and not looking in the right places for other people interested in having me help? I'm not looking for anything in particular, just something to fill some time with and see if I like making games. If not, well I'll go back to my software projects. I just have one more year of highschool and I'd like to try a few different areas before I go to college.

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  • Shoring up deficiencies in a "home grown" programmer?

    - by JohnP
    I started out by teaching myself BASIC on a Vic 20, and in college (mid 80's) I had Fortran, Pascal, limited C, machine and assembler (With a smattering of COBOL). I didn't touch programming from approx 1989 to 1999. At that point, I was lucky enough to get hired as a Clipper programmer. Took me about 6 months to learn most of it, and by now (13 yrs) I'm pretty expert in it. I have also picked up Cold Fusion, some C#, some ASP, SQL, etc. I know programming structures, but in most languages I'm missing the esoterics, and I know my code could be much tighter. The problem is that I've learned what I needed to, to get the job done. This results in a lot of gaps in practical knowledge. I am also missing out on a TON of theory. Things like SRP, Refactoring, etc are alien terms. (Although I grok the intent after a short read). In addition, I am in the position now of teaching junior programmers the company and our software, and I don't want to pass on the knowledge gaps. I know this is somewhat of a subjective question and may be closed, but how do you go back and pick up what you've missed?

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  • Need Directions to become a programmer [closed]

    - by Omin
    Before youguys go on about how there are many types of programmers, please read through the post. Long term goal: Develop my own software (company) Short term goal: Get a job that involves coding/programming Current status: Support Analyst (at a software company but does not involve any programming) with 40k salary, 3rd year computer engineering student I had everything figured out. I'm going to develop a 2D scrolling game for iphone or android, publish the app, sell a bunch, and then apply at a studios as a software developer. And then something hit me. I think I need to get a job that involes programming to learn as much as I can in the shortest time possible. So I got a phone interview at a fast growing start up software company, passed that no problem, but then had to take an online technical assessment. That failed miserably. I thought that if I could just present myself, show that I am hard working, positive attitude, eager to make self improvements, type of a guy, I could get the job. I was wrong. And now, I am lost. Im thinking of staying with my job until I find a new one as a programmer. I will be working, self studying, and trying to make this happen without finishing university. I forgot to mention that the online technical assessment was based on data structures/algorithms, OO design, runtime complexity. I was hoping that I could get some guidence. Should I be focusing on app development or study computer science fundamentals? I have a list of books I can be going through: Learning C# O'Reilly (I got interested in C# because of Unity3D and Mono), C# 5.0 in a Nutshell, Head First Design Patterns, Code Complete, Introduction to Algorithms, Programming Interviews Exposed, Cracking the Coding Interview, The Google Resume.

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  • How to move from Programmer to Project Lead

    - by DoctaStooge
    At my job, I'm currently a programmer, but in the next few weeks I'll be taking control my own project. I was wondering if anyone else here has been in the same situation, and if so, what advice you can offer to help me be able to better run my project. Experience in dealing with contractors would be greatly appreciated. A little more info: Project will have 3 people including myself, with extra people coming in when needing testing. The project has been programmed mainly by 2 people I would like to contribute to the programming as I like doing it and think I can add to the program, but am afraid of how the contractors will react. I don't want to create bad feelings which may harm the project. EDIT: Forgot to mention that I'll have to be picking up communications with customers to make sure their needs are met. Any advice on talking to customers cold would be greatly appreciated. EDIT 2: This is not a new project, I'm picking it up around version 6. Sorry that I didn't make it clear before.

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  • How employable am I as a programmer?

    - by dsimcha
    I'm currently a Ph.D. student in Biomedical Engineering with a concentration in computational biology and am starting to think about what I want to do after graduate school. I feel like I've accumulated a lot of programming skills while in grad school, but taken a very non-traditional path to learning all this stuff. I'm wondering whether I would have an easy time getting hired as a programmer and could fall back on that if I can't find a good job directly in my field, and if so whether I would qualify for a more prestigious position than "code monkey". Things I Have Going For Me Approximately 4 years of experience programming as part of my research. I believe I have a solid enough grasp of the fundamentals that I could pick up new languages and technologies pretty fast, and could demonstrate this in an interview. Good math and statistics skills. An extensive portfolio of open source work (and the knowledge that working on these projects implies): I wrote a statistics library in D, mostly from scratch. I wrote a parallelism library (parallel map, reduce, foreach, task parallelism, pipelining, etc.) that is currently in review for adoption by the D standard library. I wrote a 2D plotting library for D against the GTK Cairo backend. I currently use it for most of the figures I make for my research. I've contributed several major performance optimizations to the D garbage collector. (Most of these were low-hanging fruit, but it still shows my knowledge of low-level issues like memory management, pointers and bit twiddling.) I've contributed lots of miscellaneous bug fixes to the D standard library and could show the change logs to prove it. (This demonstrates my ability read other people's code.) Things I Have Going Against Me Most of my programming experience is in D and Python. I have very little to virtually no experience in the more established, "enterprise-y" languages like Java, C# and C++, though I have learned a decent amount about these languages from small, one-off projects and discussions about language design in the D community. In general I have absolutely no knowledge of "enterprise-y" technlogies. I've never used a framework before, possibly because most reusable code for scientific work and for D tends to call itself a "library" instead. I have virtually no formal computer science/software engineering training. Almost all of my knowledge comes from talking to programming geek friends, reading blogs, forums, StackOverflow, etc. I have zero professional experience with the official title of "developer", "software engineer", or something similar.

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  • I don't know C. And why should I learn it?

    - by Stephen
    My first programming language was PHP (gasp). After that I started working with JavaScript. I've recently done work in C#. I've never once looked at low or mid level languages like C. The general consensus in the programming-community-at-large is that "a programmer who hasn't learned something like C, frankly, just can't handle programming concepts like pointers, data types, passing values by reference, etc." I do not agree. I argue that: Because high level languages are easily accessible, more "non-programmers" dive in and make a mess, and In order to really get anything done in a high level language, one needs to understand the same similar concepts that most proponents of "learn-low-level-first" evangelize about. Some people need to know C. Those people have jobs that require them to write low to mid-level code. I'm sure C is awesome. I'm sure there are a few bad programmers who know C. My question is, why the bias? As a good, honest, hungry programmer, if I had to learn C (for some unforeseen reason), I would learn C. Considering the multitude of languages out there, shouldn't good programmers focus on learning what advances us? Shouldn't we learn what interests us? Should we not utilize our finite time moving forward? Why do some programmers disagree with this? I believe that striving for excellence in what you do is the fundamental deterministic trait between good programmers and bad ones. Does anyone have any real world examples of how something written in a high level language--say Java, Pascal, PHP, or Javascript--truely benefitted from a prior knowledge of C? Examples would be most appreciated. (revised to better coincide with the six guidelines.)

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