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  • Difference between coder and programmer in common examples, rules

    - by MInner
    Real definition is a kind of definition based on out-of-subjects axioms, rules. (Subjective, I know.) It's easy to speak about 'difference ..' with person, who's in programming. But usually it's quite hard to show difference to the person who have never used to write program. How do you think - which examples, analogies, logical chains are best for showing this kind of difference. The only example, which comes to mind is - economist (coder) and mathematician (programmer). How do you feel about it?

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  • I wanted to be a programmer

    - by Henrik P. Hessel
    Hello, let me ask your opinion. I'm 25 now, living in Germany. I started with QBASIC, did some Java in Highschool, and after School I created some Websites in PHP. Now, because my Company is Microsoft Gold Partner, I've to use Microsoft all the time. C#, MSSQL, ASPX and Sharepoint <- I really hate it! So, in my spare I concentrate to gain more knowledge (C++, Java, Silverlight or WPF), because it feels that I'm so far behind, in comparison for example to you guys, or other older employees in my company. Do think that my behaviour is useful? Should I focus my time to become i.e. a pure C# Programmer? I did C# even before I started to learn some C++. Should I learn what do with pointers, memcpy and stuff like that, even if managed code brings us so much benefits? Or is it a waste of time, better invested in learning the latest technologies? rAyt

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  • Convert wife/husband/partner to a programmer.

    - by Stefan
    originally posted by Stefan: How many of you have had the thought of educate your partner and invite him/her to the beautiful world of programming? I once started to give my wife lessons twice a week, It was a competition between me and another programmer, we thought it would be nice to have our wives understand why we work as programmers and also have it as a hobby sitting all night long. Maybe we could get our wives to feel the power too? After a couple of months my wife didn't like the idea any more, it was too hard to understand she thought, same for my friends wife. So now we are thinking of some project that would be too fun for our wives to turn down just to get the spirit up again. It would be nice to hand over a project to my wife, "Can you debug this for me, please? There are some strange error on module xxx." :) Maybe I'm crazy, what do you think?

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  • Pay for Graphic Designer vs Programmer

    - by FrankSinatra
    In a corporate web-design setup, who typically makes more per hour, the graphic designer or the programmer? By graphic designer, I mean somebody who builds mockups probably in photoshop, selects font-styles, colors, etc. Most things layout-wise are near pixel-perfect, but likely after the initial implementation by the programmer, there will be a lot of small changes directed by the graphic designer. By programmer, I mean somebody who is coding the CSS, the HTML, and light backend support, probably in PHP. The programmer will attempt to duplicate the mockups given the limitations of the medium, and consult with the graphic designer afterwards on what changes are tangible and which are not. Both probably have an undergraduate degree from a respected four-year institution.

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  • "A good programmer can be as 10+ times more productive as a mediocre one"

    - by m3th0dman
    I had read an interview with a great programmer (it is not in English) and in it he said that "a great programmer can be as 100 times as good as a mediocre one" giving reason for why good programmers are very well paid and why programming companies give many facilities for their employees. The idea was that there is a very large demand for good programmers, because of the above reason and that's why companies pay very much to bring them. Do you agree with this statement? Do you know any objective facts that could support it? Edit: The question has nothing to do with experience; if you talk about one great programmer with 1 year experience then s/he should be 10 times more productive than a mediocre programmer with 1 year experience. I agree that from certain experience years onwards, things start to dissipate but that's not the purpose of the question.

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  • "A good programmer can be as 10+ times more productive than a mediocre one"

    - by m3th0dman
    I had read an interview with a great programmer (it is not in English) and in it he said that "a great programmer can be as 100 times as good as a mediocre one" giving reason for why good programmers are very well paid and why programming companies give many facilities for their employees. The idea was that there is a very large demand for good programmers, because of the above reason and that's why companies pay very much to bring them. Do you agree with this statement? Do you know any objective facts that could support it? Edit: The question has nothing to do with experience; if you talk about one great programmer with 1 year experience then s/he should be 10 times more productive than a mediocre programmer with 1 year experience. I agree that from certain experience years onwards, things start to dissipate but that's not the purpose of the question.

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  • How do I make the correct career decision in regards to product manager/QA vs programmer?

    - by Adel
    I'm curious about how to approach the issue of whether I should focus on programming or on QA/testing/product management. I know that the latter seems like a broad category( if so, think of it as "general IT support" for now). At the moment I'm stronger in QA/prod. mgt ; however I'd like to switch more to programming, and I see I may have this opportunity. Wouldn't it be easier to switch to QA/prod. mgt in the future, if I go into programming now; rather than trying the reverse-order(i.e. if I decided later to go into coding.. say around mid-30s then it'd likely be harder). Just looking for any advice or tips about how to see more clearly. Part of me is scared I can't handle the programming side, but part of me says since there's demand and I'm interested that it's still worth a shot.

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  • What are your experiences as a programmer?

    - by jenf
    I haven't finished school yet and plan on studying Informatics and searching a job as a programmer. However I don't know any real programmers and so I don't have a real source for information on how their job actually is. I apologize if this question is subjective but I think that it is an important one to ask. What do you actually program (with)? Do you generally work with one programming language or more? Do you like working with it/them? Do you like your job? Is it kind of a hobby and a job at once?

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  • How does a programmer without a degree gain experience? [on hold]

    - by user96872
    Having a few years of experience is a must for many programming jobs nowadays. If one does not have a college degree but would like to get some experience with programming (with some prior knowledge, say, in JavaScript, PHP and Python), what are some ways to gain the experience that employers seek? I know about personal projects, but how about team experience and everything that goes along with it? Would I need to volunteer somewhere?

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  • Beta Soon Closing: Java SE 7 Programmer I (OCA) Exam

    - by Harold Green
    Just a reminder that you still have the next several weeks to take the beta exam for the new "Oracle Certified Associate, Java SE 7 Programmer" certification. From now through December 16th, you can take the "Java SE 7 Programmer I" exam (1Z1-803) for only $50 USD. Not only that, but because this only a single-exam certification - passing it puts you among the very first certified on the new Java SE 7 platform! You'll be happy to note that we worked hard to raise the bar for OCA as we built the Java SE 7 certification. The content that we considered to be more ‘conceptual knowledge-based' has been eliminated in the OCA level and has been replaced with far more practical content - what we often call "practitioner-level" concepts and questions. In fact, some of the topics that we previously covered at the Oracle Certified Professional (OCP) level is now covered at the OCA level. Doing this not only increases the value of the Java SE 7 OCA certification, but also has provided the opportunity for us to broaden the topics, concepts, questions covered at the OCP certification level. All of this adds up to more value and credibility to those who get certified on Java SE 7. The OCA exam doesn’t have prerequisites. But it is very important that you carefully review the test objectives on the exam page and assess your current skills and knowledge against that list to be sure that you're ready. From the exam page you can register to take the exam at a Pearson VUE testing center near you.Below are some helpful details on the certification track and exam. Again, register now - just a few weeks left at the special low beta price! QUICK LINKS: Certification Track: Oracle Certified Associate (OCA), Java SE 7 Programmer Certification Exam: Java SE 7 Programmer I (1Z1-803) Video: Coming Soon - Java SE 7 Certification Info: About Beta Exams Exam Registration: Instructions | Register Here

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  • Is paper indispensable in a programmer's everyday work?

    - by rwong
    As a programmer who work in a company whose vision is to make paperless office possible, is there any way I can work effectively while using less paper? I can list at least several kinds of papers I use quite often: Paper notebook, on which I do most of the pre-coding design work and ideas Books Temporary printouts of source code, though not so often (in color, with a 6 point font at 600 DPI) Sticky note, to remind myself of things that should be taken care of within a few days On the other hand, I also use a wiki and an office text editor. Once a while I would use a diagramming software to make a few flowcharts. Deeper questions: Is there a relationship between paper use and productivity? How can programmers help save the trees? Is paperless software development fundamentally different from paperless office? Related questions: Do you ever write code with pen and paper, and should we do it more often? What physical tools do you find useful to work as a programmer? What things are essential on a programmer's desk? Stuff every programmer needs while working Additional info, if it helps: Everyone has dual monitors. We have decent project management and issue tracking software (both web-based). Please be constructive. In particular, please give your answer to your peer programmers who wish to be flexible and are willing to change working style in order to become more productive as well as meeting certain their own personal values. Edited: I removed the company's view because it appears to be too flamebait. If you need to see my original words, go to the edit history. Deleted: Doxygen and whiteboard. Reason: disregarding my personal experience with these great tools, we never had to print out anything as a consequence of using/not using them. To see my original words, go to the edit history.

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  • Java language book for an experienced programmer?

    - by Andrew
    I am looking for book to get up to speed with (start with) a Java language. I am experienced (more than 15 years) C# and C++ programmer with a bit of Python, so I don't need a book which starts with a programming concepts for a beginner. In fact I think I need a "Java language specification" sort of book. I checked the answers to questions similar to mine and found that there two books which is being recommended most: "Effective Java" and "Sun Certified Java Programmer". After a quick look at the "Effective Java" I realised it should not be a book to start with, it is a good book (I read all books in Effective C++, STL series and liked them but they are more "good practices" books, rather than a book for a beginners) "Sun Certified Java Programmer" looks closer to what I am after - but goes too slow for me. So I did some more search and found these two books: The Java(TM) Language Specification by Gosling himself Java™ Programming Language, The (4th Edition) by Ken Arnold I gather the first one a little bit dated and the second one is the best Java Language Reference books up to date, but I am not sure - as I am not a Java person to make such judgements. After reading the language reference book I will start learning the basic libraries / packages / namespaces (collections, algorithms, IO, etc) and then something about UI architecture. But that will come later. Question: - which Java Language reference book for an experienced programmer you can recomend ? and why? Cheers.

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  • What is a "Technical Programmer"? [closed]

    - by Mike E
    I've noticed in job posting boards a few postings, all from European companies in the games industry, for a "Technical Programmer". The job description in both was similar, having to do with tools development, 3d graphics programming, etc. It seems to be somewhere between a Technical Artist who's more technical than artist or who can code, and a Technical Director but perhaps without the seniority/experience. Information elsewhere on the position is sparse. The title seems redundant and I haven't seen any American companies post jobs by that name exactly. One example is this job posting on gamedev.net which isn't exactly thorough. In case the link dies: Subject: Technical Programmer Frictional Games, the creators of Amnesia: The Dark Descent and the Penumbra series, are looking for a talented programmer to join the company! You will be working for a small team with a big focus on finding new and innovating solutions. We want you who are not afraid to explore uncharted territory and constantly learn new things. Self-discipline and independence are also important traits as all work will be done from home. Some the things you will work with include: 3D math, rendering, shaders and everything else related. Console development (most likely Xbox 360). Hardware implementations (support for motion controls, etc). All coding is in C++, so great skills in that is imperative. As I mentioned, the job title has appeared from European companies so maybe it goes by another title in America. What other titles might this specialization of programmer go by?

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  • Crafting an effective php/web programmer job post template [closed]

    - by Tchalvak
    I am looking to create a job post to get a satisfactory assistant programmer / templater. Specifically, a php & web programmer. I am, however, afraid of forgetting important things. So, are there resources you can suggest for templates for things to ask and things to tell in a job post for a programmer? Surprisingly, I wasn't able to find similar questions on this site, so there may be duplicate questions out there that I could use but just didn't find. Right now I know that my -requirements- are so generic that they're going to get me in trouble with a spam of applications. e.g. the candidate must know php, must be able to seperate php from html. So I'm looking for criteria that are must-haves, must-mentions, or a general template to try to avoid a "lemon". I also started a gist to work on a job post, comments/edits would be excellent: https://gist.github.com/2906808

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  • How to be a zero-bug programmer?

    - by Elaine
    My boss ever told me that as a good programmer, who should be able to ensure the code he/she changed must be reliable, correct, thoroughly self-verified, who should completely understand what all the results and impacts that he/she did or revised will cause. I did try my best to be as this kind of programmer, test again and again. But.. bugs are still there. How could I be a zero-bug programmer? know every char of my code will cause and effect?

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  • How to identify potential for becoming a programmer

    - by Jacob Spire
    There's heaps of information out there on hiring someone who's already a programmer. (Or claims to be one.) But what about identifying someone who has the potential to become a programmer, with little or no knowledge? Aside from the obvious things to look for (smart, gets things done), are there any interview questions and/or tests to determine whether one has the potential to become a programmer? Note: I'm not asking how to tell whether I can learn programming, but how to tell someone else is right for it.

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  • Stuff every programmer needs while working

    - by Desai Shukla
    I've been tasked with creating a fun and relaxing environment, one thing I know that I want is ergonomic mice and keyboards, others have suggested exercise balls and bands. What is it that every programmer needs while working? What might not be necessary but would be nice to have anyway? Note: this question was asked previously, but has been recommended to be posted here. See this link for the previous responses: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/3911911/stuff-every-programmer-needs-while-working-closed

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  • The type of programmer I want to be [closed]

    - by Aventinus_
    I'm an undergraduate Software Engineer student, although I've decided that pure programming is what I want to do for the rest of my life. The thing is that programming is a vast field and although most of its aspects are extremely interesting, soon or later I'll have to choose one (?) to focus on. I have several ideas on small projects I'd like to develop this summer, having in mind that this will gain me some experience and, in the best scenario, some cash. But the most important reason I'd like to develop something close to “professional” is to give myself direction on what I want to do as a programmer. One path is that of the Web Programmer. I enjoy PHP and MySQL, as well as HTML and CSS, although I don't really like ASP.NET. I can see myself writing web apps, using the above technologies, as well as XML and Javascript. I also have a neat idea on a Facebook app. The other path is that of the Desktop Programmer. This is a little more complicated cause I really-really enjoy high level languages such as Java and Python but not the low level ones, such as C. I use both Linux and Windows for the last 6 years and I like their latest DEs (meaning Gnome Shell and Metro). I can see myself writing desktop applications for both OSs as long as it means high level programming. Ideally I'd like being able to help the development of GNOME. The last path that interests me is the path of the Smartphone Programmer. I have created some sample applications on Android and due to Java I found it a quite interesting experience. I can also see myself as an independent smartphone developer. These 3 paths seem equally interesting at the moment due to the shallowness of my experience, I guess. I know that I should spend time with all of them and then choose the right one for me but I'd like to know what are the pros and cons in terms of learning curve, fun, job finding and of course financial rewards with each of these paths. I have fair or basic understanding of the languages/technologies I described earlier and this question will help me choose where to focus, at least for now.

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  • Good starting platform for a teenage games programmer

    - by gkrogers
    My son (15) has decided that he wants to pursue a career as a games programmer. I've said that he should get started now with a simple game. He has no programming experience yet, but I am a programmer (business apps, not games) so I can teach him programming, but what would be a good platform for him to start on? Initially I'm looking for something that can provide quick results, to keep his enthusiasm up. What would you suggest?

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  • How to practice typing of programmer keys such as tilde, pipe and programmer quote?

    - by user7893
    It is nice that there are services such as TypeRacer where you can practice casual writing but I want to practice programmer keys, covers more numbers and keys not used by regular typist. There was some tutor with which I practiced some programmer keys and noticed that my speed dropped dramatically from 70-80 wpm to even about 15-30 wpm, it also trains different muscles. So how can I practice just programming keys with programming texts or just random code pieces?

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  • A feeling that I'm not that good developer

    - by Karim
    Hi, Im having a strange feeling, but let me first introduce myself as a software developer. I started to program when I was still a kid, I had about 10 or 11 years. I really enjoy my work and never get bored from it. It's amazing how somebody could be paid for what he really likes to do and would be doing it anyway even for free. WHen I first started to program, I was feeling proud of what I was doing, each application I built was for me a success and after 2-3 year I had a feeling that I'm a coding guru. It was a nice feeling ;-) But the more I was in the field, the more types of software I started to develop I was starting to have a feeling that I'm completely wrong in that I'm guru. I felt that I'm not even a mediocre developer. Each new field I start to work on is giving me this feeling. Like when I once developed a device driver for a client, I saw how much I need to learn about device drivers. When I developed a video filter for an application, I saw how much do I still need to learn about DirectShow, Color Spaces, and all the theory behind that. The worst thing was when I started to learn algorithms. It was several years ago. I knew then the basic structures and algorithms like the sorting, some types of trees, some hashtables, strings etc.. and when I really wanted to learn a group of structures I learned about 5-6 new types and saw that in fact even this small group has several hundred subtypes of structures. It's depressing how little time people have in their lives to learn all this stuff. I'm now a software developer with about 10 years of experience and I still feel that I'm not a proficient developer when I think about things that others do in the industry. Is this normal what I'm experiencing or is it a sign of a destructive excessive ambition? Thanks in advance for any comments.

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  • Hallmarks of a Professional PHP Programmer

    - by Scotty C.
    I'm a 19 year old student who really REALLY enjoys programming, and I'm hoping to glean from your years of experience here. At present, I'm studying PHP every chance I get, and have been for about 3 years, although I've never taken any formal classes. I'd love to some day be a programmer full time, and make a good career of it. My question to you is this: What do you consider to be the hallmarks or traits of a professional programmer? Mainly in the field of PHP, but other, more generalized qualifications are also more than welcome, as I think PHP is more of a hobbyist language and may not be the language of choice in the eyes of potential employers. Please correct me if I'm wrong. Above all, I don't want to wast time on something that isn't worth while. I'm currently feeling pretty confident in my knowledge of PHP as a language, and I know that I could build just about anything I need and have it "work", but I feel sorely lacking in design concepts and code structure. I can even write object oriented code, but in my personal opinion, that isn't worth a hill of beans if it isn't organized well. For this reason, I bought Matt Zandstra's book "PHP Objects, Patterns, and Practice" and have been reading that a little every day. Anyway, I'm starting to digress a little here, so back to the original question. What advice would you give to an aspiring programmer who wants to make an impact in this field? Also, on a side note, I've been working on a project with a friend of mine that would give a fairly good idea of where I'm at coding wise. I'm gonna give a link, I don't want anyone to feel as though I'm pushing or spamming here, so don't click it if you don't want to. But if you are interested on giving some feedback there as well, you can see the code on github. I'm known as The Craw there. https://github.com/PureChat/PureChat--Beta-/tree/

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  • Evaluating a Programmer for Startup

    - by HelpJ
    Hi, I have sorted through the previous questions and couldn't find a specific answer to the following (and thank you in advance): I have fully developed my idea on paper and am looking to move forward with it, create it, and grow it. Since I am non-technical, I am looking to either partner or employ (I would pay for his/her services) for a very talented and well-rounded programmer to help create and develop the project. I am looking for someone that can act as a IT manager/CTO and get the job done while I use my resources to develop and deploy the strategy, deal with the business side of things, raise capital, grow, etc. However, due to my lack of IT knowledge, it is always hard for me to differentiate between a good and bad programmer and therefore only find out if he/she is good or not when it is too late. So my question that I have been asking everyone around me is "How do I assess whether the programmer is good or not if I cannot evaluate them myself?" and "Is there any website that reviews and rates programmers?" I have asked many to refer me to talented programmers but all are either not local (important for me to work side by side with them), happily employed or working on their own startup. I have also asked these programmers to help me find others but none seem to be able to help. Any help would be extremely appreciated. Thank you so much, HelpJ

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  • Earmarks of a Professional PHP Programmer

    - by Scotty C.
    I'm a 19 year old student who really REALLY enjoys programming, and I'm hoping to glean from your years of experience here. At present, I'm studying PHP every chance I get, and have been for about 3 years, although I've never taken any formal classes. I'd love to some day be a programmer full time, and make a good career of it. My question to you is this: What do you consider to be the earmarks or traits of a professional programmer? Mainly in the field of PHP, but other, more generalized qualifications are also more than welcome, as I think PHP is more of a hobbyist language and may not be the language of choice in the eyes of potential employers. Please correct me if I'm wrong. Above all, I don't want to wast time on something that isn't worth while. I'm currently feeling pretty confident in my knowledge of PHP as a language, and I know that I could build just about anything I need and have it "work", but I feel sorely lacking in design concepts and code structure. I can even write object oriented code, but in my personal opinion, that isn't worth a hill of beans if it isn't organized well. For this reason, I bought Matt Zandstra's book "PHP Objects, Patterns, and Practice" and have been reading that a little every day. Anyway, I'm starting to digress a little here, so back to the original question. What advice would you give to an aspiring programmer who wants to make an impact in this field? Also, on a side note, I've been working on a project with a friend of mine that would give a fairly good idea of where I'm at coding wise. I'm gonna give a link, I don't want anyone to feel as though I'm pushing or spamming here, so don't click it if you don't want to. But if you are interested on giving some feedback there as well, you can see the code on github. I'm known as The Craw there. https://github.com/PureChat/PureChat--Beta-/tree/

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