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  • Games Localization: Cultural Points

    - by ultan o'broin
    Great article about localization considerations, this times in the games space. Well worth checking out. It's rare to see such all-encompassing articles about localization considerations aimed at designers. That's a shame. The industry assumes all these things are known. The evidence from practice is that they're not and also need constant reinforcement. We're not in the games space in enterprise applications yet. However, there may be a role for them in the training space but also in CRM, building relationships and contacts. Beyond the obvious considerations, check out the cultural aspects of games localization too. For example, Zygna's offerings, which you might have played on Facebook: Zynga, which can lay claim to the two most popular social games on Facebook - FarmVille and CityVille - has recently localized both games for international audiences, and while CityVille has seen only localization for European languages, FarmVille has been localized for China, which involved rebuilding the game from the ground up. This localization process involved taking into account cultural considerations including changing the color palette to be brighter and increasing the size of the farm plots, to appeal to Chinese aesthetics and cultural experience. All the more reason to conduct research in your target markets, worldwide.

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  • Translation and Localization Resources for UX Designers

    - by ultan o'broin
    Here is a handy list of translation and localization-related resources for user experience professionals. Following these will help you design an easily translatable user experience. Most of the references here are for web pages or software. Fundamentally, remember your designs will be consumed globally, and never divorce the design process from the development or deployment effort that goes into bringing your designs to life in code. Ask yourself today: Do you know how the text you are using in your designs are delivered to the customer, even in English? Key areas that UX designers always seen to fall foul of, in my space anyway, are: Terminology that is impossible to translate (jargon, multiple modifiers, gerunds) or is used inconsistently Poorly written, verbose text (really, just write well in English, no special considerations) String construction (concatenation of parts assembled dynamically) Composite widget positioning (my favourite) Hard-coded fonts, small font sizes, or character formatting or casing that doesn't work globally Format that is not separate from content Restricted real estate not allowing for text expansion in translation Forcing formatting with breaks, and hard-coding alphabetical sorting Graphics that do not work in Bi-Di languages (because they indicate directionality and can't flip) or contain embedded text. The problems of culturally offensive icons are well known by now in the enterprise applications space, though there are some dangers, such as the use of flags to indicate language, for example. Resources Internationalization Techniques: Authoring HTML & CSS Global By Design Insert Title Here : Variables in Interface Language Prose: Internationalisation Doc and help considerations I can deal with later.

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  • OUAB Europe Globalization Topics

    - by ultan o'broin
    Pleased to announce that the Oracle Usability Advisory Board has added a globalization workgroup for 2011. This will be headed up my myself. The aims of this workgroup are: To understand how our customers use translated versions of applications To identify key international support, translation and localization-related usability issues in deployed applications To make recommendations to Oracle usability and development teams about meeting global customer usability requirements in current and future versions of our applications. Issues include: How international users use applications when working, ethnography opportunities, key cultural impacts on usability; multilingual feature usage, localization of forms and reports, language quality, extensibility, translation of user assistance, user-generated and rich-media content like UPK, and international mobile application opportunities. More details will be available on the usableapps.oracle.com website shortly.

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  • How to prepare a game for localization?

    - by kevin42
    Many projects don't think about localization until the game is done. Then localization is done as a hack, and it's obvious that it was added on later. Some specific areas of concern: Text strings (obviously) Audio clips such as music and/or narratives Text rendered on textures (e.g. a label on a crate) Text rendered in frames in pre-rendered movies Fonts/Character sets for different languages Etc. What are some good ways to prepare for these challenges in the initial development stages, so you can make it easier without incurring too much cost up front?

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  • Globalization, Localization And Why My Application Stopped Launching

    - by Paulo Morgado
    When I was localizing a Windows Phone application I was developing, I set the argument on the constructor of the AssemblyCultureAttribute for the neutral culture (en-US in this particular case) for my application. As it was late at night (or early in the dawn ) I went to sleep and, on the next day, the application wasn’t launching although it compiled just fine. I’ll have to confess that it took me a couple of nights to figure out what I had done to my application. Have you figured out what I did wrong? The documentation for the AssemblyCultureAttribute states that: The attribute is used by compilers to distinguish between a main assembly and a satellite assembly. A main assembly contains code and the neutral culture's resources. A satellite assembly contains only resources for a particular culture, as in [assembly:AssemblyCultureAttribute("de")]. Putting this attribute on an assembly and using something other than the empty string ("") for the culture name will make this assembly look like a satellite assembly, rather than a main assembly that contains executable code. Labeling a traditional code library with this attribute will break it, because no other code will be able to find the library's entry points at runtime. So, what I did was marking the once main assembly as a satellite assembly for the en-US culture which made it impossible to find its entry point. To set the the neutral culture for the assembly resources I should haveused (and eventually did) the NeutralResourcesLanguageAttribute. According to its documentation: The NeutralResourcesLanguageAttribute attribute informs the ResourceManager of the application's default culture, and also informs the ResourceManager that the default culture's resources are found in the main application assembly. When looking up resources in the same culture as the default culture, the ResourceManager automatically uses the resources located in the main assembly instead of searching for a satellite assembly. This improves lookup performance for the first resource you load, and can reduce your working set.

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  • Localization in php, best practice or approach?

    - by sree
    I am Localizing my php application. I have a dilemma on choosing best method to accomplish the same. Method 1: Currently am storing words to be localized in an array in a php file <?php $values = array ( 'welcome' => 'bienvenida' ); ?> I am using a function to extract and return each word according to requirement Method 2: Should I use a txt file that stores string of the same? <?php $welcome = 'bienvenida'; ?> My question is which is a better method, in terms of speed and effort to develop the same and why? Edit: I would like to know which method out of two is faster in responding and why would that be? also, any improvement on the above code would be appreciated!!

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  • Auto Selecting Cultures for Localization in ASP.NET

    - by Rick Strahl
    When creating multi-language Web sites, one of the key issues you need to deal with is how to assign a culture to display the appropriate resources. Whether you need to auto-switch locales based on browser language, or explicitly assign a locale based on user preferences there is generally some code logic involved in making these decisions. In this post I show what options are available and a small helper that simplifies setting the culture in ASP.NET applications.

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  • Localization of strings in static lib

    - by AO
    I have a project that uses a static library (SL). In that SL, there are a couple of strings I'd like to localize and the project includes all of the localization files. The localization works just fine when storing all text translations in the same file. The thing is that I'd like to separate the SL strings from the other strings. I have tried to put two different *.strings files (Localizable.strings and Localizable2.strings) in the language folder of interest but that did not work. I have also tried to use two *.strings file with the same name (Localizable.strings) but with different paths. It didn't work either. It seems that only one localization file is supported, right? Could anyone suggest a good way of doing this? I'm using SDK 3.2 beta 2.

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  • How do you guys handle translation for software localization?

    - by JohnFx
    Most of the software I have written over my career has been built for English speaking customers, but recently I've been working on a project where localization of the UI for a wider range of languages is desired. I am just curious how other programming shops obtain the translations. Do they use the notoriously flawed online translation engines? I know there are for-hire translators out there, but am I going to have to track down and contract like a dozen of them to do a thorough job of localizing my interface? Are there services that specialize in doing this for a wide range of languages? Perhaps using something like Amazon's Mechanical Turk would be an option, but I have no idea how diverse the available workforce is on that site. I'd imagine not very.

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  • WPF Localization file folder

    - by Jefim
    I have a WPF application with localization. In my project file (.csproj) I have added a string: <UICulture>en-US</UICulture> Now the problem is - when I compile the default localization (en-US folder) is always put to the root of $(OutDir) of the project. Question: how do I move this directory into a subfolder (say, $(OutDir)localized\en-US)?

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  • iPhone localization - some localized XIBs do not load

    - by Jacek
    Hello, I have made an iPhone app with localized versions. It mostly works fine, but there are two views in which localized NIBs do not load. Standard NIBs (in English) are used. I am sure I made localization properly ("Get Info", "Make file localizable", "Add Localization", added "pl" - for Polish, and then edited created NIB). All the other views are fine. What might be the problem? Thanks for helping me.

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  • disable browser localization

    - by broiyan
    How do I get the websites that I visit to stop localizing the language probably according to my IP location? This is an website specific issue because, for example economist.com and superuser.com do not do it, but Google Checkout and craigslist.org are doing it. Is there a way to setup Ubuntu and Firefox so that English will always be used for all web pages displayed? Edit: Of course many webpages have a link to an English version, but sometimes they don't. For example I believe such links usually appear on the root resource but sometimes I see non-English languages on child resources where such links do not appear. Example: most Blogger.com blogs appear in English but when I go to the blogger's profile ("view my complete profile"), it appears in another language that matches my geographic location.

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  • Localization as an afterthought-- screwed?

    - by David
    So I signed on with a startup web development company as a subcontractor. They are putting together a large, complex user/product management system for a company that needs to support multiple levels of hierarchial localization. I signed a 3 month contract, and upon looking at their code, wish I hadn't. They opted to write their own MVC framework (I guess the client company didn't want to use a prewritten one) and it's extremely poorly written. There's SQL scattered throughout almost every model view and controller (and there's no parameter-based find methods, it's all SQL) and they haven't even THOUGHT about localization yet-- something that will have an affect on nearly EVERY query. The due date is 4 months away, and I honestly think we'd make good progress by scrapping the whole thing and going with CakePHP. Have any of you been in a similar situation, and what did you do? PS: This is written in PHP/MySQL.

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  • How to handle localization in javascript files?

    - by Arnis L.
    I want javascript to be separated from views. Got requirement to implement localization for simple image button generated by JS: <img src="..." onclick="..." title="Close" /> What's the best technique to localize title of it? P.s. Found a solution by Ayende. This is the right direction. Edit: I got Localization helper class which provides Controller.Resource('foo') extension method. Thinking about to extend it (helper) so it could return all JavaScript resources (from "ClientSideResources" subfolder in App_LocalResources) for specified controller by it's name. Then - call it in BaseController, add it to ViewData and render it in Layout. Would that be a good idea?

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  • HOW TO MAKE localization?

    - by hatemGamil
    hi all I have a question about localization how can i do localization lets say that i have a dropdown list that holds the available languages: English,french and arabic and I have a label which get it says "good morning",so i want to change the lang. according to selected lang. in drop down list so when the user chooses french label will say "bonjour" and when the user slect arabic the label will hold "???? ?????" AND MOVE IT FROM THE LEFT OF THE PAGE TO THE RIGHT BECAUSE ARABIC IS WRITTEN FROM RIGHT TO LEFT ,, ANY HELP WILL BE HIGHLY APPERCAITED THNX IN ADVACE

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  • iphone: accessing the preferences localization file from code

    - by phonecoddy
    I was just facing the following problem and couldn't find a solution for it. Hopefully someone could help. The app I am working on has some preferences, which are using a localization file. Now I want to use labels in my app, which display the exact names, which are used in the localization file for the preferences. But I couldn't find a way to access the information which is stored in Settings.bundle - en.lproj - localizationfile.strings. to make this clear: If you open your preferences for your app, the display shows the localized string of the title and the value of the setting. I need to access the localized string of the title of each preference from my code. Does any know how to do this?

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  • WiX 3 Tutorial: Custom EULA License and MSI localization

    - by Mladen Prajdic
    In this part of the ongoing Wix tutorial series we’ll take a look at how to localize your MSI into different languages. We’re still the mighty SuperForm: Program that takes care of all your label color needs. :) Localizing the MSI With WiX 3.0 localizing an MSI is pretty much a simple and straightforward process. First let look at the WiX project Properties->Build. There you can see "Cultures to build" textbox. Put specific cultures to build into the testbox or leave it empty to build all of them. Cultures have to be in correct culture format like en-US, en-GB or de-DE. Next we have to tell WiX which cultures we actually have in our project. Take a look at the first post in the series about Solution/Project structure and look at the Lang directory in the project structure picture. There we have de-de and en-us subfolders each with its own localized stuff. In the subfolders pay attention to the WXL files Loc_de-de.wxl and Loc_en-us.wxl. Each one has a <String Id="LANG"> under the WixLocalization root node. By including the string with id LANG we tell WiX we want that culture built. For English we have <String Id="LANG">1033</String>, for German <String Id="LANG">1031</String> in Loc_de-de.wxl and for French we’d have to create another file Loc_fr-FR.wxl and put <String Id="LANG">1036</String>. WXL files are localization files. Any string we want to localize we have to put in there. To reference it we use loc keyword like this: !(loc.IdOfTheVariable) => !(loc.MustCloseSuperForm) This is our Loc_en-us.wxl. Note that German wxl has an identical structure but values are in German. <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?><WixLocalization Culture="en-us" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/wix/2006/localization" Codepage="1252"> <String Id="LANG">1033</String> <String Id="ProductName">SuperForm</String> <String Id="LicenseRtf" Overridable="yes">\Lang\en-us\EULA_en-us.rtf</String> <String Id="ManufacturerName">My Company Name</String> <String Id="AppNotSupported">This application is is not supported on your current OS. Minimal OS supported is Windows XP SP2</String> <String Id="DotNetFrameworkNeeded">.NET Framework 3.5 is required. Please install the .NET Framework then run this installer again.</String> <String Id="MustCloseSuperForm">Must close SuperForm!</String> <String Id="SuperFormNewerVersionInstalled">A newer version of !(loc.ProductName) is already installed.</String> <String Id="ProductKeyCheckDialog_Title">!(loc.ProductName) setup</String> <String Id="ProductKeyCheckDialogControls_Title">!(loc.ProductName) Product check</String> <String Id="ProductKeyCheckDialogControls_Description">Plese Enter following information to perform the licence check.</String> <String Id="ProductKeyCheckDialogControls_FullName">Full Name:</String> <String Id="ProductKeyCheckDialogControls_Organization">Organization:</String> <String Id="ProductKeyCheckDialogControls_ProductKey">Product Key:</String> <String Id="ProductKeyCheckDialogControls_InvalidProductKey">The product key you entered is invalid. Please call user support.</String> </WixLocalization>   As you can see from the file we can use localization variables in other variables like we do for SuperFormNewerVersionInstalled string. ProductKeyCheckDialog* strings are to localize a custom dialog for Product key check which we’ll look at in the next post. Built in dialog text localization Under the de-de folder there’s also the WixUI_de-de.wxl file. This files contains German translations of all texts that are in WiX built in dialogs. It can be downloaded from WiX 3.0.5419.0 Source Forge site. Download the wix3-sources.zip and go to \src\ext\UIExtension\wixlib. There you’ll find already translated all WiX texts in 12 Languages. Localizing the custom EULA license Here it gets ugly. We can override the default EULA license easily by overriding WixUILicenseRtf WiX variable like this: <WixVariable Id="WixUILicenseRtf" Value="License.rtf" /> where License.rtf is the name of your custom EULA license file. The downside of this method is that you can only have one license file which means no localization for it. That’s why we need to make a workaround. License is checked on a dialog name LicenseAgreementDialog. What we have to do is overwrite that dialog and insert the functionality for localization. This is a code for LicenseAgreementDialogOverwritten.wxs, an overwritten LicenseAgreementDialog that supports localization. LicenseAcceptedOverwritten replaces the LicenseAccepted built in variable. <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" ?><Wix xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/wix/2006/wi"> <Fragment> <UI> <Dialog Id="LicenseAgreementDialogOverwritten" Width="370" Height="270" Title="!(loc.LicenseAgreementDlg_Title)"> <Control Id="LicenseAcceptedOverwrittenCheckBox" Type="CheckBox" X="20" Y="207" Width="330" Height="18" CheckBoxValue="1" Property="LicenseAcceptedOverwritten" Text="!(loc.LicenseAgreementDlgLicenseAcceptedCheckBox)" /> <Control Id="Back" Type="PushButton" X="180" Y="243" Width="56" Height="17" Text="!(loc.WixUIBack)" /> <Control Id="Next" Type="PushButton" X="236" Y="243" Width="56" Height="17" Default="yes" Text="!(loc.WixUINext)"> <Publish Event="SpawnWaitDialog" Value="WaitForCostingDlg">CostingComplete = 1</Publish> <Condition Action="disable"> <![CDATA[ LicenseAcceptedOverwritten <> "1" ]]> </Condition> <Condition Action="enable">LicenseAcceptedOverwritten = "1"</Condition> </Control> <Control Id="Cancel" Type="PushButton" X="304" Y="243" Width="56" Height="17" Cancel="yes" Text="!(loc.WixUICancel)"> <Publish Event="SpawnDialog" Value="CancelDlg">1</Publish> </Control> <Control Id="BannerBitmap" Type="Bitmap" X="0" Y="0" Width="370" Height="44" TabSkip="no" Text="!(loc.LicenseAgreementDlgBannerBitmap)" /> <Control Id="LicenseText" Type="ScrollableText" X="20" Y="60" Width="330" Height="140" Sunken="yes" TabSkip="no"> <!-- This is original line --> <!--<Text SourceFile="!(wix.WixUILicenseRtf=$(var.LicenseRtf))" />--> <!-- To enable EULA localization we change it to this --> <Text SourceFile="$(var.ProjectDir)\!(loc.LicenseRtf)" /> <!-- In each of localization files (wxl) put line like this: <String Id="LicenseRtf" Overridable="yes">\Lang\en-us\EULA_en-us.rtf</String>--> </Control> <Control Id="Print" Type="PushButton" X="112" Y="243" Width="56" Height="17" Text="!(loc.WixUIPrint)"> <Publish Event="DoAction" Value="WixUIPrintEula">1</Publish> </Control> <Control Id="BannerLine" Type="Line" X="0" Y="44" Width="370" Height="0" /> <Control Id="BottomLine" Type="Line" X="0" Y="234" Width="370" Height="0" /> <Control Id="Description" Type="Text" X="25" Y="23" Width="340" Height="15" Transparent="yes" NoPrefix="yes" Text="!(loc.LicenseAgreementDlgDescription)" /> <Control Id="Title" Type="Text" X="15" Y="6" Width="200" Height="15" Transparent="yes" NoPrefix="yes" Text="!(loc.LicenseAgreementDlgTitle)" /> </Dialog> </UI> </Fragment></Wix>   Look at the Control with Id "LicenseText” and read the comments. We’ve changed the original license text source to "$(var.ProjectDir)\!(loc.LicenseRtf)". var.ProjectDir is the directory of the project file. The !(loc.LicenseRtf) is where the magic happens. Scroll up and take a look at the wxl localization file example. We have the LicenseRtf declared there and it’s been made overridable so developers can change it if they want. The value of the LicenseRtf is the path to our localized EULA relative to the WiX project directory. With little hacking we’ve achieved a fully localizable installer package.   The final step is to insert the extended LicenseAgreementDialogOverwritten license dialog into the installer GUI chain. This is how it’s done under the <UI> node of course.   <UI> <!-- code to be discussed in later posts –> <!-- BEGIN UI LOGIC FOR CLEAN INSTALLER --> <Publish Dialog="WelcomeDlg" Control="Next" Event="NewDialog" Value="LicenseAgreementDialogOverwritten">1</Publish> <Publish Dialog="LicenseAgreementDialogOverwritten" Control="Back" Event="NewDialog" Value="WelcomeDlg">1</Publish> <Publish Dialog="LicenseAgreementDialogOverwritten" Control="Next" Event="NewDialog" Value="ProductKeyCheckDialog">LicenseAcceptedOverwritten = "1" AND NOT OLDER_VERSION_FOUND</Publish> <Publish Dialog="InstallDirDlg" Control="Back" Event="NewDialog" Value="ProductKeyCheckDialog">1</Publish> <!-- END UI LOGIC FOR CLEAN INSTALLER –> <!-- code to be discussed in later posts --></UI> For a thing that should be simple for the end developer to do, localization can be a bit advanced for the novice WiXer. Hope this post makes the journey easier and that next versions of WiX improve this process. WiX 3 tutorial by Mladen Prajdic navigation WiX 3 Tutorial: Solution/Project structure and Dev resources WiX 3 Tutorial: Understanding main wxs and wxi file WiX 3 Tutorial: Generating file/directory fragments with Heat.exe  WiX 3 Tutorial: Custom EULA License and MSI localization WiX 3 Tutorial: Product Key Check custom action WiX 3 Tutorial: Building an updater WiX 3 Tutorial: Icons and installer pictures WiX 3 Tutorial: Creating a Bootstrapper

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  • Xcode 3.2.2 and localization of Settings.bundle

    - by unforgiven
    I have just discovered that after upgrading to the latest Xcode 3.2.2, I am not able anymore to localize Settings.bundle. The "Make File Localizable button always appears grayed out, and the Settings.bundle files appear with "No Explicit File Encoding", instead of UTF-16. This happens not just for my old projects, it happens even for new projects. Any clue? Is the localization procedure changed? Thank you in advance.

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  • good database design for localization

    - by rap-uvic
    Hi, I have 3 tables for localization: Locales, ResourceKeys, and Resources. Resources is a many to many table between ResourceKeys and Locales, and stores Resource values for each resource key in multiple languages. Now if I have a table called Event, which needs a localized title and description, how do I best do this? Do I create foreign key columns in Event table which point to ResourceKey IDs each for title and description, or is there a better way?

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  • what localization changes are needed for Arabic with Java Applet

    - by Tom
    How big task is it to implement support for Arabic localization, our Java 1.5 Applet was designed as fully localizable (european languages) but now we plan to add also arabic as a new language. We are using custom GUI text i/o components inherited from Component class using e.g. Drawstring, how well is arabic supported within Component class ? The keyboard input is done with KeyListener getKeyChar, getKeyCode etc.

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  • localization with core data

    - by Tristan
    Hi there, Does anyone have any recommendations with localization of core data? My application will have information that will sometimes be the same in both langauges, such as a person's photo, or different such as the person's biography. From what I understand, it's possible to localize the field names (http://developer.apple.com/library/mac/#documentation/Cocoa/Conceptual/CoreData/Articles/cdUsingMOM.html#//apple_ref/doc/uid/TP40005190-SW13), but what's the best course of action for field values? Thanks! Tristan

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  • Is there a light and simple php framework that provides basic localization and/or internationalizati

    - by janoChen
    I would like a php framework that: Is simple and lightweight It work in shared hosting (free hosting) I'll be nice if it saves the preferred language using cookies (not necessary) I'll be nicer if it detects user's preferred language from the browser (not necessary) I want to build a page that displays 3 different languages. I came out with a mini localization framework but I think is kinda buggy. Any suggestions?

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  • Enhance Localization performances? (ComponentResourceManager.ApplyResources)

    - by Srodriguez
    Dear all, After experiencing some performances issues on my client side, we decided to give a try to some of the performance profilers to try to find the bottleneck or identify the guilty parts of the code. Of course, as many performance investigations, the problems comes from various things, but something I find out is that the ComponentResourceManager.ApplyResources of my user controls takes way too much time in the construction of my forms: more than 24% of the construction time is spent in the ApplyResources inside the InitializeComponent(). This seems rather a lot for only "finding a resource string and putting it in it's container". What is exactly done in the ComponentResourceManager.ApplyResources ? I guess more than searching the string, if not it wouldn't take that long. Is there a way to enhance the performances of the localization? Our software is localized in several languages, so we do need to keep this multi-lingual feature. Any recommendations regarding this issue? Thanks! PS: We are coding in C#, .NET 3.5 SP1.

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  • WinForms - Localization - UI controls positions different in additional Culture

    - by binball
    Hi, I did my UI settings.Original language is English. After that I set Localizable property to True. Copied original resx file to frmMain.de-De.resx (for example). Translated all strings. Everything works. But now I would like to change positions of controls. After that changes are visible only for original/primary Culture (En). When I change Culture to de-De then UI controls are on the "old positions"(?!) Is this normal behaviour? :O I'm unable to change controls positions on my form after localization? Can someone explain me this and give some best solution. I really have to change UI design but I don't want to manual copy all translated strings again. If my description is not clear then I can post source code, just please let me know. I use VS 2008. Greetz!

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  • VB.NET localization

    - by PandaNL
    In my winform app in VB.NET I want to use the localization option. But i have a few questions/problems. I'm using a menu strip to select an other language. But it seems that is doesn't change my menustip text to my selected language. It does change my labels, buttons, and textboxes but menu strips don't seem to change when I choose another language. Also is it possible to get those resx files such as MyForm.fr-FR.resx compiled so it isn't an external file outside my app? Or to get those files in an Language folder at the same location of my app, so i don't have all those fr-FR, nl-Nl folders in the same location as my program?

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